Monday, July 10, 2006

God in Your Image???

Following in the tradition of "Mother, Child, Womb" or as my wife has put it, "Rock, Paper, Scissors," here is a graphic regarding the current controversy in the PCUSA (and several other denominations). It brings a chuckle and a tear to those of us on the right who have been watching the unfolding of a systematic revisionism among mainline leaders, such as some in the Presbyterian Church.

1 comment:

Italian-Swamp-Yankee said...

Metaphorchangeaoholics

We use analogies, metaphors, and similes to describe God. It seems traditional evangelical churches use these devices to simplify theological understandings. When progressive evangelicals use these devices it theologically confuses people. Conversely, Jesus himself took great pains to simplify his role in the scope between God & people and the testaments.
Biblical revisionists claim “no moral truth; nothing is black or white; everything is gray”. They claim strong ancestral cavemen (“persons of cave”) oppressed the truth, created legendary stories and passed down throughout the millennia. Those stories, they say, sprinkled with truth became distorted by patriarchal, monarchal metaphors, unfair to the oppressed and week, particularly women and freethinkers.
The first place to dissemble truth is to question its genesis and claim everything springing-forth from it is cultic myth important only for that people, for that day. They feel a need to tell “our own” story applicable to a progressive society. This is where un-tethered hyper-liberalism becomes destructive to innocent people. These are they who donned the golden calf for all Israel to worship while poor Moses was receiving the Word of God. These calculating progressives take 2 steps forward/1 step back to infiltrate traditional evangelical institutions.
In recent times, with the advent of mediums like the Internet and choice cable TV, Trinitarian-haters are being exposed for who they are. It may be time for them to take 1 step back, buck-up, and use some traditional metaphors—otherwise, they may lose some weaker, wholesome, unwitting converts, the very people on whom they impose theological protection.